The Griper 1954 Young America Films (Centron)

Support this channel: https://paypal.me/jeffquitney OR https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney more at http://quickfound.net/ Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise…

The Griper 1954 Young America Films (Centron)

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Support this channel: https://paypal.me/jeffquitney OR https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney

more at http://quickfound.net/

Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_guidance_film
Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Social guidance films constitute a genre of educational films attempting to guide children and adults to behave in certain ways. Originally produced by the U.S. government as “attitude-building films” during World War II, the genre grew to be a common source of instruction in elementary and high school classrooms in the United States from the late 1940s to the early 1970s. The films covered topics including courtesy, grammar, social etiquette and dating, personal hygiene and grooming, health and fitness, civic and moral responsibility, sexuality, child safety, national loyalty, racial and social prejudice, juvenile delinquency, drug use, and driver safety; the genre also includes films for adults, covering topics such as marriage, business etiquette, general safety, home economics, career counseling and how to balance budgets. A subset is known as hygiene films addressing mental hygiene and sexual hygiene…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centron_Corporation

Centron Corporation was a leading industrial and educational film production company, specializing in classroom and corporate 16mm films and VHS videocassettes. Although a slightly smaller company than its contemporaries (Encyclopædia Britannica Films, Coronet Films and Learning Corporation of America), it was nonetheless very successful from the late 1940s through the early 1990s, gaining added fame with the Academy Award-nominated Leo Beuerman in 1969…

Overview

Founded in 1947 in Lawrence, Kansas by boyhood friends Arthur H. Wolf (a veteran of another Kansas film company, Calvin Films) and Russell A. Mosser (of Boeing-Witchita), the name was chosen to incorporate the key words “central” (being that the company was located in the center of the United States) and “electronic” in honor of the “electronic age of the future”.

Centron successfully competed with large companies on both coasts and was widely known for its high quality films, coming in on time and under budget. Although the company kept afloat for decades making many technical instructions, cooking and sewing demonstrations, teacher aides and safety prevention reels, it also added some social guidance films in the 1950s to compete with Coronet Films, along with zoological and geographic topics that held stronger interest among school students.

Harold “Herk” Harvey was a principal director at Centron. His 1962 feature Carnival of Souls was produced with several people associated with Centron. John Clifford, a Centron screenwriter wrote the script for Carnival of Souls…

Although Centron won many awards for its films, it is most famous for the Oscar nominated Leo Beuerman. This simple profile of a short handicapped man with his tractor in downtown Lawrence was produced on a budget of $12,000 and eventually became one of the most popular classroom films of all time, selling an impressive 2300 prints.

…The 1970s was a particularly golden age for nature documentaries, especially the Elementary Natural Science series of the team of Karl and Stephen Maslowski.

In 1981, Wolf and Mosser sold Centron to the Coronet division of Esquire, Inc. Production carried on, mostly in Illinois, under the Coronet banner for a few years with Bob Kohl as primary head. (The Phoenix Learning Group currently has distribution rights to the Coronet library, including many of Centron.) In 1984, the Gulf and Western Industries conglomerate took over the mother company and, in a swift move, Kohl successfully purchased Centron from Gulf and moved production back to Lawrence, Kansas. After continuing through the end of the decade (including a series of instructional films for Encyclopædia Britannica), Kohl then sold the company facilities to the University of Kansas in 1991, with the library of films added to their archive by the time the company officially folded in 1994…

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