How to Run a Sub 3 Hour Marathon, Boston Qualifier or Marathon PR | Heart Rate Training on Long Runs

A lot of runners want to run a Sub 3 Hour Marathon or Boston Qualifier, yet many of them fail to accomplish this. I’m here to help break down what goes wrong in training and racing to improve from there.…

How to Run a Sub 3 Hour Marathon, Boston Qualifier or Marathon PR | Heart Rate Training on Long Runs

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A lot of runners want to run a Sub 3 Hour Marathon or Boston Qualifier, yet many of them fail to accomplish this. I’m here to help break down what goes wrong in training and racing to improve from there. Video transcript: Hi my name is Floris Gierman. I’m excited about the launch of my new site http://extramilest.com. It’s focused on running, in particular about How to Run a Sub 3 Hour Marathon or a Boston Marathon Qualifier.

I improved my marathon time from 4:11 to 2:44 at the Boston marathon by training smarter, not harder. I’m excited to share all the things I’ve learned over the years to become a faster, healthier and happier runner. Hopefully this will help you on your journey to improve your running and your health

In the coming months I’ll be posting several videos and blog posts, probably on a weekly basis. Although the topics are aimed around running and Heart Rate training, the focus will be much broader with important topics like Nutrition for your training and for race days, training your mind, importance of rest and recovery, creating personalized training schedules etc

I have created a Free PDF with the Fundamentals of Training and Racing. There is a link on my site http://extramilest.com to get you to this PDF and to sign up for my weekly newsletter.

One question I’m often asked is: How do I get faster to run a sub 3 hour marathon? The number one mistake I see is that many runners train at a Heart Rate and pace that’s too high and fast for their current fitness level. Several years ago I came across Dr Phil Maffetone’s work, he is a world class endurance coach and author of 20 books. He changed my approach to running completely with low HR training. Slowing down your HR in most of your training runs will develop your aerobic system, so over time you can run the same pace at a lower HR.

Most runners who miss their marathon goal start out their race strong, but in the later parts of the race their blood lactate increases, and their blood sugar lowers, so they are unable to maintain this goal pace, around mile 18 to 22. Not that they don’t want to, physically not able to.

There are many different training methods to prepare you to run a fast marathon. A few popular ones are Jack Daniels Plan A, Pfitzinger 55-70, 70-85, 85+, Galloway Goal Sub 2:59, Higdon Advanced or Hanson Advanced. Each training approach and plan has unique aspects, differentiating between the length of the plan, starting milage, ramp up, rest, days/week, longest run, intensity, etc.

These training plans work for many to accomplish their goals, but many runners fail using these programs as well. ** they feel the programs are too hard, they get injured, or the schedule just does not work for them.

Every athlete is different, some have more muscles or body fat than others, some are very fit with a solid aerobic base and others lack current fitness, some have had specific injuries or sicknesses. When a training plan tells you to train at a certain pace, for example 7:30 min / miles, but your fitness level is at 9 min/ miles, you’re training at a heart rate that’s too high for your current fitness and you’re adding a significant amount of stress on your body. 9 out of 10 people I get in contact with train too often at a Heart Rate that’s too high for them, this increases cortisol stress hormone levels, slows down aerobic development and increases risk of injuries.

You don’t need speed work to become a faster runner. You can progress for many months by only running aerobic miles, so running only at a low heart rate. Most of the training plans schedule speed workouts, such as intervals or tempo runs, in week 1 of the training cycle. There is a time and place for some speed work, however you don’t need to start with 1 or 2 speed sessions per week until several months into your training cycle.

I trained for my Boston 2:44 PR with only 6% of my running time at high HR, the rest was all aerobic at low HR using Maffetone’s 180 formula.

There are several strategies and tactics to stay motivated to put in your best effort and go the extra mile to reach your marathon goals. This is one of the most exciting parts. We are capable of accomplishing so much more, with clear goal setting, more about this.

You can now learn these Fundamentals in a nice 30 page PDF, this can be downloaded for free at http://extramilest.com

Full video transcript available at http://extramilest.com

YOU CAN FIND ME, FLORIS GIERMAN HERE:
• Strava – https://www.strava.com/athletes/1329785
• YouTube – https://bit.ly/2CfLJbK
• Newsletter with Running Tips and Racing Strategies – https://bit.ly/2QFc3ky
• My website – https://extramilest.com
• Marathon PR Training Course: https://extramilest.com/marathon/
• Podcast – https://extramilest.com/podcast/
• Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/florisgierman
• Extramilest Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/2M3qP40
• Facebook (Personal) – https://www.facebook.com/flotographer

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